Fashion

A London Fashion Week like no other

Five takeaways from Burberry and beyond

25.09.2020

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It might be the strangest fashion month in history, but it is happening nonetheless. After New York came London, and with it an air of change. There were open air catwalk shows, intimate presentations and virtual experiences - here are some of the best bits.

Paria Farzaneh and an apocalyptic farm

The rising star of British fashion scene, Paria Farzaneh showed her latest creations at a sunny farm in Little Missenden, near Amersham. The guests sat on the grass, while the models appeared in colourful smoke, wearing camouflage and utility-influenced clothing. The surprise of the show: the editor and style icon Caroline Issa debuted as a model. “There are troubles in America. We all share the common goal, creativity runs strong in our blood, and we can’t let it go, especially not now. We must plant the seed for a new perspective,” said Farzaneh in her show notes.

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Christopher Kane’s art

The rising star of British fashion scene, Paria Farzaneh showed her latest creations at a sunny farm in Little Missenden, near Amersham. The guests sat on the grass, while the models appeared in colourful smoke, wearing camouflage and utility-influenced clothing. The surprise of the show: the editor and style icon Caroline Issa debuted as a model. “There are troubles in America. We all share the common goal, creativity runs strong in our blood, and we can’t let it go, especially not now. We must plant the seed for a new perspective,” said Farzaneh in her show notes.

The new world of Victoria Beckham

The rising star of British fashion scene, Paria Farzaneh showed her latest creations at a sunny farm in Little Missenden, near Amersham. The guests sat on the grass, while the models appeared in colourful smoke, wearing camouflage and utility-influenced clothing. The surprise of the show: the editor and style icon Caroline Issa debuted as a model. “There are troubles in America. We all share the common goal, creativity runs strong in our blood, and we can’t let it go, especially not now. We must plant the seed for a new perspective,” said Farzaneh in her show notes.

Burberry’s forest

The rising star of British fashion scene, Paria Farzaneh showed her latest creations at a sunny farm in Little Missenden, near Amersham. The guests sat on the grass, while the models appeared in colourful smoke, wearing camouflage and utility-influenced clothing. The surprise of the show: the editor and style icon Caroline Issa debuted as a model. “There are troubles in America. We all share the common goal, creativity runs strong in our blood, and we can’t let it go, especially not now. We must plant the seed for a new perspective,” said Farzaneh in her show notes.

Bora Aksu’s history lesson

Bora Aksu presented his collection in the rose garden behind St. Paul’s Church in Covent Garden. Guests guests sat on park benches, respecting social distancing, while models breezed by in silk masks. The collection was inspired by WWI and the influenza pandemic of 1918. "Dedicated to these contrasting times, Bora Aksu creates a collection that reflects WWI, the pandemic time, and the decadence of 1920s," the designer explained in his show notes. "The change in women’s roles in society, especially the nurses and the way they dressed, is the source of inspiration... Examining how the styles changed and how women rediscovered their femininity, is reflected in a very light, layered, yet effortless way in this collection."

Game, Set and Match by David Koma

“I always had sports around me; my father handed me a tennis racket when I was four,” says David Koma, who brought the court to the catwalk with his interpretation of the classic tennis wardrobe. “This season especially, I felt like I wanted to do something that I loved.” Raised in a tennis-mad family (his brother is a professional tennis player and has his own tennis academy in Saint Petersburg), the Georgian-born designer decided to focus on lattice sweaters, asymmetric minidresses, cyclic shorts and accessories such as visors, sweatbands and even a tennis racket. Oh and of course, everything was encrusted with his signature crystals.

A Tribute to Frontline Workers at Halpern

Michael Halpern spent his lockdown in London, volunteering in a mask factory in London. It's why he decided to devote his SS21 collection to the real life heroines, “the ones who put their lives one the line for us everyday”. He cast eight women he met during a stint at the factory - train operators, healthcare assistants, nurses and hospital cleaners - and shot them in a compelling film, where they swapped their everyday uniforms for voluminous and fluffy party outfits. Joyous!

Simone Rocha’s Romantic Escapism

Simone Rocha was one of the few who staged a physical presentation. The Irish designer gathered between 20 and 30 editors and buyers at Mayfair's Hauser & Wirth gallery, where ten socially-distanced models showcased her collection. “People want to dress in a way that feels familiar and practical, which I completely understand, but I still feel there is a craving for escapism and freedom and romanticism,” Rocha explained. This time, she played with texture and form, mixing wide-hipped silhouettes with embroidered full-skirt dresses and ruffled pyjama shirts. And as ever, there were pearls.

Erdem's Literary Learnings

During a preview of the collection in his South Audley Street store, instead of show notes, Erdem Moralioglu gave reporters and buyers a book he'd read during lockdown: Susan Sontag’s book The Volcano Lover. The story of the Lady Emma Hamilton, who in the 18th Century, married a volcanologist but had an affair with Lord Nelson, became his main inspiration for the collection. Think embroidered muslin and organza dresses, opera coats and admiral jackets.

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